Paul H. Dunn

Telling whoppers for the Lord, schmoozing with Donny and Marie while getting rich selling tapes and books. "Hey, did I ever tell you about the time I was in that fox hole and batted away a burst of machine gun bullets with my Louisville rifle faster than Ted Williams could hit a home run?"

Paul H Dunn winning Word War II all by himself. blank spacer Paul H Dunn's fables.

These four photos show Dunn's "modest, servant of the Lord home" located in an exclusive Alpine, Utah country club estate. You helped pay for this home by purchasing Dunn's tapes and books.

I still have that baseball

10/13/2013 - by Dave on the Ball

I still have that baseball, and those are my pictures that you have. I took them sitting on a brass candle stick holder.

It was signed after he spoke at the Roanoke/Salem Ward in Roanoke, VA in the late 70's - early 80's.

He was my hero and I joined the Marine Corps in 1982 with the knowledge that if I believed the things he/we did that the dark angel would pass me by. His stories inspired me and I survived Parris Island because of them.

Only later in life would I discover they were all untruths.

Then I started investigating the Mormon church and discovered, like his stories, all of it was riddled with untruths.

Good luck with your journey into truth.

Beat him with a broken bat

03/13/2010 - by Dirk

As a teenager I heard the tapes and tried to be a perfect person; I hoped I would be someone like Paul H. Dunn.

I lived for baseball as well, and at age 16 my new league played only Sunday doubleheaders. If I played I would miss a summer of church..."What would Dunn do?" I seriously questioned myself for months.

I did not play that year. I guess it was my decision...but I would really have liked to have some words with that faker, then beat him with a broken bat. I played the next two seasons with guilt, but I HAD TO PLAY.

He stole something from me that I know I would have never lost if it wasn't for his dream telling that I wanted to believe in.

Dunn had us in stitches

04/08/2009 - by Baura

I met Paul H. Dunn shortly after his call as a GA in the mid '60s. He went to the University of Arizona as the LDS representative for "Religion in Life Week." It was a week where representatives of various religions would be on campus for dinners, meetings etc.

At the kick-off meeting all the reps spoke and P.H. Dunn was, without question, the most entertaining. Later in the week all the reps spoke to the R.O.T.C. classes and P.H. Dunn was the one that spoke in mine. He told the story of the guy dying in his arms no more than ten feet away from me. After he left the instructor (non-Mo) told us that we were lucky because we got to hear the best one of the reps.

I remember thinking at the time how the story had a "mythical" quality to it but, hey, it really happened so I guess it's not just in the movies.

On Sunday at sac mtg the ONLY speaker was P.H. Dunn. He basically did an hour of stand-up and had the whole congregation in stitches.

When I heard later that he'd made it all up things made more sense. If he would have not been a "truth" merchant and had only been an entertainer he could have been a great one.

Dunn did decieve but I still believe

04/07/2009 - by Jon

In 1989 I attended a special multi-zone conference put together by one of the assistants to the president who was a rabid fan of Elder Dunn. I'd heard his talks before and was enthusiastic about attending. He stood in front of us and rattled off in monotone every story he had ever told until his voice began to get hoarse.

It was hot in the chapel and the missionaries began to wilt after several hours, some falling asleep. Eventually Elder Dunn stopped in mid sentence and said, "Well it looks like you've given up on me so I'll give up on you." This ended his talk.

During the long talk, the thought occurred to me that his stories were simply not true. They couldn't be.

I mentioned this on the ride home and the assistant who had organized the event essentially tore me a new corn hole. I felt vindicated (though justifiably disappointed) a few years later when the truth was revealed, but I have always felt sad for this young missionary, I think his name was Clanton, who had essentially based his faith on the dubious testimony of one man. I am sure he was crushed.

I am still a faithful member because my testimony is based on more than faith in imperfect men.

I was close to Dunn's oldest daughter

03/04/2009 - by phyllis

Janet was my laurel advisor when i was a very tbm (True Believing Mormon), very impressionable 16-year old in Irvine in the mid-70's (laurel class president, which gave me even more excuses to hang out with her). I hate to say it but my crush on my mom was replaced by a crush on her. She was one of the most by-the-book, but still very compassionate, tbm's I knew.

Of course i thought it all came from the great example her dad set. Little did i know. I remember one Sunday when her dad was in the area, speaking at our stake conference. He was staying at her house of course and she mentioned something about him taking a nap right after church because he was very stressed and tired. I can imagine the stress, not at all what I thought it was then, but the stress of living such a huge lie would wear anyone with a half a conscience out.

An icy countenance

03/04/2009 - by Mormon Observer

I was a new TBM, very TBM. Our Institute director was a good bud of his and had him come talk at our Institute graduation. (actually it was my Institute graduation) Anyway he gave this wonderful warm talk then we all lined up to see him and shake hands. I had one of his 'talks' on a cassette with Credeance clearwater Gold on the other side of the tape. Imagine! I was so awed I didn't have the nerve to tell him the flip side of my tape of his had Credance (Rock music was considered somewhat taboo in the 70s.)

He was a huge man, well over 6 feet tall, when I shook hands with him I looked up into an icy countenance. It really surprised me. His talks were so warm and personable but to meet him in person he was colder than an iceberg. I didn't know it at the time, I was 'discerning' what he really was. It wasn't until the 2000s that I found out the New Age Mormons have a term for a TBM like I was, it's a "Mormon Mystic". Fanciful name, means you actually have real spiritual experiences and intuition and don't have to cry and make up stories, because you experience the real thing! Enough to help me leave the church when it was time too.!!!!

I once knew a President of the MTC (Missionary Training Center) who knew Paul Dunn

03/04/2009 - by Listener

According to this man, Dunn's wife was very, very demanding and pushed Dunn hard toward being spiritually and financially sucessful -- especially regarding his book sales. A daughter was reported to have said that if she ever needed more money her dad could always write another book.

This man felt that it was family pressure - especially wife - that made Dunn turn out the way he did.

I was one of Paul Dunn's missionaies

03/04/2009 - by old time misssionary

I was one of Paul Dunn's missionaies - I was one of his Zone Leaders. I also served with Boyd K Packer. Paul Dunn replaced BKP in 1968. I had an opportunity to be in many situations with Paul Dunn, where he could have easily played the heavy, plastic, gamemanship, BKP GA card. In most cases though that just wasn't Paul Dunn's style.

And I've often thought that this accounted for much of his problem - that he himself didn't believe the role he was playing and felt trapped by it. I'm not excusing what he did with the way he lied. I'm just saying that I don't think it was REALLY him.

Could it be that he was as much victim of the LDS Church as are many other BIC (Born in the Covenant) Mormons?

Real Marine takes on Paul H Dunn

11/11/2008 - by 70's seminary student

I think I listened to almost every talk Paul H Dunn had ever at least recorded up until the mid 1970,s. My high school seminary teacher was in total awe of the man. My father knew he was a liar,and expressed so at the very peril of his standing in the church.

You see old Paul H traveled down to our little hamlet in central utah in the late 60,s and spoke at, I believe it was stake conference. Where as he started in on this whopper about watching the battle of Iwo Jima rage from ships along with some fellow soldiers (Yes Army) and immediately volunteered to go in and do some of the more dangerous things that they were having trouble getting the beat up and battered Marines to do.

My dad was 5 division 26th Marines,had landed on Red Beach 2 on day one and actually had lived through some of the horrible things Paul h Dunn fantasized about. My father was hotter than the volcanic ash under Mt. Surabachi.

He immediately after the service told his bishop and whoever would listen that Paul H dunn was a liar and should be confronted and he personally would like to be the man to do it. He was told he had better let it go,and was actually questioned if he was sure as to what really transpired on Iwo Jima.

Boy, wrong question! Anyway my dad never wavered and it cost him with good church members. When Paul H Dunn was unmasked I think my dad felt justified (though he never gloated) but he knew Paul H Dunn had never been there. As I am sure there were mormon men from Omaha beach that knew Paul H Dunn was not one of them.

Baseball fans had to of known. We sometimes find ourselves in such a sorry state because of the fear to question authority. I do find pride in knowing that my dad tried even at the risk of losing all his standing in his community. He thought that was an extremely small price to pay compared to alot of men he had known that had paid the ultimate price to claim to have been on Iwo Jima.

Today is November 11th, my dad died 5 years ago. On this Veteran's Day I do think and thank all the men like my dad that realy have served in the absolute most horrible conditions our world has ever known. And to question men like Paul H Dunn that realy did serve his country honorably (HE WAS A SOLDIER ON OKINAWA) with no doing of his own, he, Paul H Dunn was placed in mostly safe areas doing safe things during his time. With just a slight change and no doing of his own he could have just as easily been at Omaha Beach, Bastogne or Peilu, etc, just where the Army needed bodies at the time. And I am sure Paul H Dunn would have done his duty. Just the cards never unfolded that way so Paul H Dunn made a living telling whoppers and was able to miss out on the never ending wake up in the middle of the night nightmares that my dad suffered with to his last day. email: name:

Neighborhood Watch Report on Paul H Dunn's Home

04/10/2008 - by A close neighbor to PHD

There is much to question of the accuracy of the filth that is on this sight.

I have lived next to the Dunns for many years in the neighborhood that is shown in the picture of their home. Those who post information such as this about one they accuse of lying might want to question their own integrity of telling the truth.

The people who installed the pool in that home were the people who purchased the house from Elder Dunn's wife a year after he died. The last name is the Barry's, parents of one of the BYU quarterbacks who played second string behind John Beck.

This web site is slanderous, and any that accuses one of lying while lying themselves loses all credibility.

Editor's Note: Lying? Why then did Dunn make a public apology for lying? See his apology below. Perhaps living too close to Dunn's old home causes one to lose all credibility?

Paul H Dunn, Three Nephites and the Constitutional Convention

03/05/2008 - by Ben Franklin and others

Ever heard this Three Nephite Story Rumor?

The story goes that at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, things were getting so heated that it was all about to break down. All of a sudden some guy who nobody knew showed up, and resolved the crisis. The Convention proceeded to draft the U.S. constitution. The mysterious individual was never heard from again. That's how I heard it, anyways.

It's been years since I heard this story, if I have left out details please fill me in.

Definitely true - by Paul H Dunn

You see, I was there. Before I pitched for the Cardinals or single-handedly won WWII, I was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. But I was late getting to the Convention because I had to stop on my way there and save a town from a flood. By the time I got there, the Convention was well underway and no one knew me. But things were going very badly. None of the delegates could agree on any aspect of what the Constitution should say.

After praying to Heavenly Father for guidance, I stepped into the room and was immediately inspired as to the proper form that the U.S. government should take. After dictating the whole Constitution and seeing the other delegates nodding in agreement, I knew that my job was done and left.

On my way home, I saved Martha Washington from a pack of wolves, and then retired to my humble 50,000 acre farm to await the invention of the game of baseball, being called upon eventually to win the battle of Gettysburg and save the Union. In graditude (and awe), President Lincoln asked me write a few remarks that he could give at the dedication of the military cemetery at Gettysburg. I, of course, was honored to oblige him.

I was then semi-retired until Pearl Harbor, when FDR secretly contacted me to take control of the war effort. After defeating the Germans and Japanese, I was finally able to engage in my favorite pastime - playing baseball, where I quickly led the St. Louis Cardinals to 16 consecutive World Series titles, while compiling a lifetime batting average of .640 and being named MVP 14 times. I would have broken Babe Ruth's home run record, but the Lard called me to be a General Authority first.

Of course, I had to comply with that request, and then proceeded to personally open the entire continents of South America and Asia to missionary work.

How's that for a Faith Promoting Story!

Documentation available - by Mark Hofmann

It's true and he signed a draft copy of the Declaration, which I have. I would be willing to sell it for the right price or do a straight swap for the M'lellen collection.

Perfect timing for my history lesson - by Guatemango Verde

As the Lard would have it in his infinite wisdom and omnipotent control of the timing of many universes, this is the week I finally got around to teaching about the Constitutional Convention. Now that I know the TRUE story, I will be a much more effective teacher.

I was about to make a big mistake and go off about how the framers of the Constitution got their ideas from the Magna Carta, and Montesquieu, and the Iroquois Confederacy, and John Locke and other such rubbish. But it all makes so much more sense to me now that I know about the 3 Nephites' and Paul Dunn's involvement.

I wish I would have known all of this last week before I turned in the lesson plans for my annual, formal evaluation. I'm sure my principal will be in for quite a surprise when he observes my lesson and sees me deviating from my original plans about all that Montesquieu separation of powers crap. It may come as a shock to him at first, but I'm sure in the end he will be grateful to know the TRUTH.

Brother Franklin and Elder Dunn, thank you for your timely intervention and unknowing participation in the Lard's great plan; and thank you for saving my career.

P.S.: Elder Dunn, I'm still a bit unclear about your role in ending the Great Depression. Perhaps you could elaborate, as my 7th graders will need know this for the upcoming high-stakes, standardized tests. I don't mean to impose, but you know, I'd just hate to leave any children behind or something.

Well, since you asked by Paul H Dunn

I usually don't like to tout my own achievements, but since you asked, I will explain about the Great Depression.

The New Deal was really all my idea. The CCC, WPA, and RFC? My ideas. I picked out the spot for Hoover Dam. I designed the thing myself. I personally convinced a majority of Congress to pass the Social Security Act and the minimum wage bill. I set up the Federal Reserve System, and masterminded the recovery of the banking system.

I could have ended the Great Depression two years earlier, but I spent he years 1930-31 working on my pick-off move - which paid great dividends in 1952. I remember it well... the seventh game of the World Series. We were leading 12-11 in the bottom of the ninth inning (thanks to my 3 grand slams). I was playing centerfield, and due to an injury, also had to cover leftfield. Our pitcher walked the first three batters, leaving the bases loaded with none out, and the great Ted Williams coming to the plate. The Manager called for me to come in and pitch. As I walked in from the outfield, I said a silent prayer to the Lard to bless me with the strength to accomplish the tasks he had sent me to do.

As I stood on the mound, I could see Ted Williams eyes- man, did he look like he was in the zone. As he waited for my first pitch, I suddenly wheeled and threw to third base. I ended up picking off all three runners on the play thereby saving the victory for the Cardinals.

I was then promptly elected Mayor of St. Louis by the grateful fans. From that position, I designed the Gateway Arch which now serves as the signature of that great city.

Next week, I might tell you about my leadership of the (misnamed) Lewis and Clark expedition or how I was the first to reach the North Pole.

Excellent, excellent - by Guatemango Verde

I always suspected that the left-wing media had injected their liberal bias into our nation's history textbooks. It is very nice indeed to finally know the truth. It's a shame your great and varied accomplishments have gone largely unrecognized (except, of course, for your nearly single handed baseball victory in '52)

I will make sure to contact the Arizona Department of Education tomorrow and demand that the social studies standards be revised to more accurately reflect the achievements of Paul H Dunn. After that, we'll take it national.

Growing up in Southern CA during the '60's and early 70's

05/21/2007 - by WPH, former TBM but never again a institutionalized religion believer

Growing up in Southern CA during the '60's and early 70's, I remember Bro Paul's awe inspiring (and overwhelmingly faith promoting) stories of WWII and professional baseball, in my early morning seminary class. His tapes were of the few seminary lessons that kept me awake at 6:30 a.m.! My teacher, Sister TBM, used to sob when Bro. Paul would convey his dying buddies last "patriotic" request from the bloody shores of Guam, or Iwo Jima, or Mad Magazine, or where ever the fabrication originated! After listening to many of his WWII near death testimonials during seminary, I remember thinking to myself, "man, this Dunn dude is ONE LUCKY MoFo ... in fact, a bit TOO lucky?" His stories sounded too much like a Hollywood script, one of those Frank Capra "propaganda" war movies, from the "Why We Fight" series (which every U.S. soldier had to view before they went into combat).

However, if I even so much as hinted at disbelief, I would garnish the "jaws of death" looks from my teacher or classmates. Eventually, I just avoided listening to his speeches since they sounded too fairytale-ish, too fantastic, to me. But I also learned to never whisper any cord of dissent about Hero Dunn either, as it would only bring condemnation upon me. After the truth all came spilling out in the early '90's, I wanted to scream "I told you so" to each TBM who gave me the evil eye back in my seminary days. I had long since washed my hands of Mormonism in the early '80's, so the revelation of Dunn's bullshit caused nothing but delight within myself.

As far as the "bosom burning" feeling that people rejoiced over when listening to Dunn's fantacies? Hey, we feel what we want to feel. If we get a high from listening to Paul H. Dunn's bogus war stories and baseball stories, it's because we want to, we need to, there is an inner desire to be convinced of our security within our little belief system, our world of comfort and respite from an ugly world. Dunn only fed that need. I'm sure he consideded the philosophy of "the ends justifies the means." If the ends will bring needed joy, increased conviction, warm-goosebumpy faith promoting feelings, and more royalty MONEY to his bank account, and in the end his audience had a greater sense of belief in Mormonism, eh, what the hell ... lie away, the end result will justify all the lies along the way. Besides, all that money and glory makes it a win/win situation? It's the American way.

(I say that with tongue-in-cheek. In all actuality, I hope the bastard burns in Hell for scaming so many blind sheep). I firmly believe that the day will come when the truth of all the behind-the-scenes bullshit and lying, secret scheming, cover-ups, whitewashing of their history, persecuting those who speak out in the name of truth, and money grubbing, of the Mormon church will be laid bare for the eyes of the world to inspect, for all to see in the light of truth. Then this little Dunn incident will appear miniscule, insignificant, if not petty, compared to what real bullshit is going on with Gordy and his merry band of conspiring liars. Then will the "Whore of all the Earth," the "Great and Abominable Church, that loves to make a lie," come crumbling down, and great shall be her fall.

Paul Dunn strikes out with Mormon believer

03/01/2007 - by Tim Beck

I was a teen-ager in the late 70's when Paul Dunn's poularity was at its apex. I received the usual library of Dunn books for high school graduation gifts. I listened to every Paul Dunn recording when I served an LDS mission from 78 to 80. After I returned from my mission i gave a lot of thought to the work product of Paul Dunn and realized that most, if not all, of his written and recorded accounts were fabricated or at-least greatly exagerated. I came to this conclussion based on the realization that the average person has one such fantastic experience in their life, but Paul Dunn had a new one for every talk he gave or every book he wrote; from playing major legue base ball to successfully running through a mine field to having a german tank park on his head on the field of battle, Dunn had a fanatstic story to illustrate his point.

When I mentioned these observations to my mother, she got very angry an told me that I "shouldn't speak ill of the Lord's annointed". I countered her comments with the logic that if some one conspires to decieve they are no longer the Lord's annointed. She would not discuss the issue further with me after that.

When the story of Dunn's deception came to light I was not surprized nor did I feel vindicated; I felt bad. I felt bad for people who had deffended Paul Dunn and believed in him, I felt bad for the damage his actions would cause the LDS church and I felt bad for the people whoes tetimonies of the LDS church would be damaged by his deception. I am aware of many people who have heard every Dunn talk, read every Dunn book but never read the Book of Mormon, the Holy Bible or the Doctorine and Covenants; people whose religious belief is based on what I have come to call "Mormon Fluff".

Since my realization of Paul Dunn's deception I have been very suspect of any author or performer that makes their living playing to a strictly LDS audience or following: people like Carole Lynn Pearson, Sheri L. Dew, John Bytheway, Jack Weyland, Blaine Yorgason and many others who produce nothing more than feel-good-fluff that mascarades as inspirational fare but does nothing more than distract people from the real doctorine of the restored gospel.

The day I looked up Paul H. Dunn in the Encyclopedia of Baseball

03/22/2006 - by Makurosu

When I was about junior high age, I was really into Avalon Hill's Statis-Pro Major League Baseball. It was a game of skill and chance that used the stats of real major league baseball players. You could play teams against each other, trade players if you wanted, have all-star games, or you could play out a tournament. It was a cool game. I still have it somewhere.

Anyway, this was the early 1980's when my Mom started coming home with Paul H. Dunn talk tapes. Dunn used to talk about his experiences playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, and how all these rough, tough baseball players, like Ted Williams, used to come to his room after games and tell him how much they admired him and wanted to be like him. He would pray with them and teach them about the Gospel. I was impressed. Ted Williams - wow.

At that time, I was creating teams for my game, like the 1927 Yankees or the 1975 Cincinnati Reds. I would play them against each other and watch Babe Ruth and Lou Gherig beat the snot out of Pete Rose, Joe Morgan, and Johnny Bench. I thought it might be cool to have Paul H. Dunn as a player in my game too, maybe in some sort of all-star game. So, I went to the library and pulled out the hallowed Encyclopedia of Baseball, a great big book which had all the stats of every pro baseball player ever to play in the major leagues. That's where I got my stats.

There was a problem though. They had no Paul H. Dunn listed as having played for the St. Louis Cardinals. There was a Paul Dunn listed, but he didn't play for the Cardinals, and he was from the wrong time period. So, I thought maybe I got it wrong. I went back to Dunn's tape, "They Want What You And I Have" and sure enough he said he played for the St. Louis Cardinals. The Encyclopedia of Baseball had every major league player, so I was confused.

I remember asking Mom who Paul H. Dunn was and why he was making up stories about playing in the major leagues. I asked her if he was also making up stories about being a church leader. Mom went off like a teapot, and I never mentioned the name of Paul H. Dunn again around her.

This apparent contradition bugged me for a long time, until it finally came out that, yeah, Dunn used to tell a lot of stories. Oh well, at least church leaders have the gift of discernment, right?

Dunn actually played for a Cards' minor league team for six weeks

03/22/2006 - by Randy J

From

http://www.xmission.com/~country/reason/dunn.htm

"Dunn's baseball stories are as legendary as his war stories.
"He has written and told audiences that he signed a contract to play for the St. Louis Cardinals after graduation from high school....
"But in truth, Dunn never played a game for the St. Louis Cardinals or any major-league team.
"The closest he came was playing six weeks 'off-roster' in several practice and exhibition games in 1942 for the Pocatello (Idaho) Cardinals, a St. Louis Cardinal farm team. He was cut.
"Baseball records show that Dunn signed a professional player contract in 1947 with the Ontario Orioles, in California's 'Class C' Sunset League. But he practiced only a few weeks, played only in the first regular game and then was released." (Arizona Republic, Feb. 16, 1991)"

Let's remember that in 1942, lots of ball players were serving in WWII. Because of that, many mediocre players got spots on teams. It says a lot about Dunn's baseball skills that he was cut from a minor league team after only six weeks during wartime. And it's highly unusual for a player to be kept on roster during spring training, only to be released after the very first regular-season game. If players are to be cut, it usually happens before spring training ends. Something must have gone horribly wrong for Dunn to have been released from a class C team, where the talent level is barely above high school players, for Dunn to be cut.

Also, while it's possible that Dunn could have met Ted Williams during spring training in 1942, it's highly doubtful that Williams would have given a no-talent minor league prospect the time of day, let alone engage in serous conversations.

Hell, when I was a teenager, I operated the scoreboard for the Detroit Tigers' AA team. I lived only two blocks from the stadium, so I could walk there. Two boys who lived next door to me were the batboys one year. The players would sometimes let me and some friends shag flies during batting practice, or take a few swings with them. One player, pitcher Jack Morris, was a Mormon, and I used to give him rides to church when the team was in town. Jack went on to win 254 major league games and four World Series championship rings.

In my experiences, I probably got to know more players who became major league stars, with a number of teams, than Paul Dunn ever did. And I probably spent more actual time on the playing field than he did, too. But I wouldn't try to make a career of going on the lecture circuit and drop names of players I've known to make young people ooh and aah over me.

And Gordon B Hinckley said about it

03/22/2006 - by BtGR

I attended a Regional Priesthood Leadership meeting in Tempe, AZ the Saturday afternoon that the AZ Republic broke the story that Paul H. Dunn had been a liar. GBH stood at the pulpit with the newspaper in his hand and, I kid you not, said "I do not know anything about this".

He went on to say that Bro. Dunn had been ill and he had not seen him nor talked with him in a very long time. Right GBH. You didn't know the AZ Republic was going to publish the story. None of the 15 were interested or concerned about the impact the story would have. The stone's just rolling forward like it always has. BS!!! What a lyin' sack of sh!t.

RUFF RUFF

Dunn's public statement - apology

October 23, 1991 - by Pau H Dunn

I have been accused of various activities unbecoming a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

I confess that I have not always been accurate in my public talks and writings. Furthermore, I have indulged in other activities inconsistent with the high and sacred office which I have held.

For all of these I feel a deep sense of remorse, and ask forgiveness of any whom I may have offended.

My brethern of the General Authorities, over a long period of time, have conducted in-depth investigations of the charges made against me. They have weighed the evidence. They have censured me and placed a heavy penalty upon me.

I accept their censure and the imposed penalty, and pledge to conduct my life in such a way as to merit their confidence and full fellowship.

In making these acknowledgements, I plead for the understanding of my brethern and sisters throughout the Church and give assurance of my determination so to live as to bring added respect to the cause I deeply love, and honor to the Lord who is my Redeemer.

Sincerely, Paul H. Dunn

How many of you knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that Paul H. Dunn's stories were true?

05/22/2004 - by Jack and others

Admit it. During your TBM (True Believing Mormon) days, when you heard a faith promoting Paul H. Dunn story, you felt a lump in your throat, a burning in your bosom, and you knew that the spirit was testifying to you the truthfulness of Brother Dunn's story. When he was exposed as a teller of 'inspired fiction' how did you explain the spirit that you felt? My TBM defenses shot up and I told myself that even if his stories weren't exactly true, that wasn't important. What was important was that his stories were spiritual and inspirational and strengthned my testimony as well as others, and because of that, I forgave Paul Dunn and felt he was being unjustly persecuted. Man was I brainwashed.

little Japanese children - DemonwithaGlasshand

Good stories and I suspect there is a lot that is true in them. If only religious leaders of all stripes would refrain from pious fraud. I didn't necessarily doubt his stories. But I was a little suspicious of the time he converted his squad leader. And I still want to know whether or not little Japanese children ran across no man's land with explosives on their backs ready to jump into American trenches and pull the pin. Knowing the Japanese mind as I do it wouldn't surprise me if it was a short-lived tactic say, on Saipan, where hundreds jumped off the cliff. Anyone know for sure?

Absolutely - Searcher68

I KNEW his stories were true just as much as I KNEW the BoM was true. I was a TBM in college when he was at his apex of popularity.

I remember a story he told in gen. conf. about an experience he had as a MP (in Mass.). He had just received an elder with an "Idaho haircut". We all know he meant that this mishie was a hick. The next morning he announced that he was going to assign this elder to an area that has Harvard in it. His a**istant was surprised and challenged him on the assignment.. Paul said that he had been arguing with the HG all night and if the a**istant wanted to continue arguing with the HG he was welcomed. It got a big laugh from the audience.

When that talk was published, HB Lee had the reference to arguing with the HG edited out. I remember being shocked. Word was that Lee was very unhappy with Paul’s irreverence. I was caught between two men I really believed in. Later I met Lee in person and up close. Probably a good thing. Very cold person. Very judgmental. Very full of his own self-righteousness. If there was a word for him it was a**hole. I guess Paul was too, although, for some reason, I still like him. Maybe I feel bad for him because he was one morg leader liar out of many that got caught.

Dunn and Eyre - free

I knew that there was something definitely dodgy when I was 15 years old and realized that the real author of many of his books was Richard Eyre. He was a mission president in England with my father. Richard Eyre used Paul Dunn's name just so that he could get more name recognition and sell more books. :-)

My favorite GA - suem

He even came to one our seminary special events to speak. I got to shake his hand. I was so convinced that I was looking at someone who had walked and talked with Jesus.

I was well out of the Morg before he was completely uncovered as a fraud. But even while on my mission TSCC made reference to some embellishment in his stories. I didn't care...I loved him!

Buying Dunn's material - BeenThereDoneThatXMO

I Bought All Of Dunn's Stories Hook, Line & Sinker...Gag!

I personally saw him speak numerous times at youth conferences, stake conferences and even as a prelude to a "Saturday's Warrior" performance where I had invited some friends to. I bought all his stories at the time and "felt the spirit" tell me they were true...I bought it all...just like I bought everything else about the Church. It took 25 years and a mission to finally grow a brain and realize that I had been duped by all of those around me who I trusted. Mormons make the best liars because of how they are raised. Joseph Smith was a liar on down the line to Gordon B.Hinckley. It is just one of the many pervasive problems in the Church from the top - down. GBH knows deep down inside he is not a "prophet" just as everyone down the hierarchy from apostles, seventies, regional reps, stake presidents, bishops etc know they are nothing special. Why this fraud is allowed to be perpetrated is beyond me. Do they do it for the money and power (upper echelons) or for some other reason. Who knows why? Perhaps it is the one way and only way they can make their relatively insignificant selves/personal lives take on some sort of meaning. It is a travesty to all. I keep a wide berth from known liars in my professional, business and personal life, and that is why I have distanced myself from the church. Why should I pander to or accommodate those of questionable mores. Why should I lower my standards to fit into a "social club" as is the church.

Bishop warned me - soccer mom

Actually. my bishop told me to be skeptical of the stories bBelieve it or not. My dad was my bishop at the time Dunn was selling alot of books. Dunn's stories were told repeatedly in church meetings, as you know. I was a teenager at the time and a friend gave me a Paul H Dunn book as a gift. My dad was uncomfortable with his over the top stories, and I remember him telling me to be skeptical of his stories and to stick to the scriptures. He also told me apostles were entitled to opinions and their opinions were not doctrine. He was never called to be a stake president (of course) but most of the people in the ward liked him alot. He was sure right about Dunn.

Never considered - the dreaded single adult

I never considered that they might NOT be true and I remember that he was a 'favorite' among our MIA-crowd. (Probably because he told such entertaining stories...)

It never occurred to me, back then, that leaders in the church might lie.... :^)

Even as - TonySoprano

Even as a TBM, I thought Paul Dunn's stories were total BS, and deeply resented the reactions from other TBM's when I would express my observation that the stories were just a little too pat and a little too fantastic. Not being from the Utah culture, I knew how the rest of the world really operated, and it did not operate the way Dunn portrayed it. My questions about him were dismissed with a smug "you're from back East and not as spiritual as we are" attitude.

(By the way, I also got the same reaction when I said that "Saturday's Warrior" was absolute crap.)

Paul Dunn was a f*cking liar in a culture of f*ucking liars. I understand that his books and tapes still sell at Deseret Book. Glad I'm gone.

As a teen - anon>

I felt the spirit and joined as a teen because I thought I'd heard a spiritual giant talk.

Even worse, for many years thereafter I developed a deep sadness because I could not make things happen in my life as portrayed by Paul Dunn and stories in the Ensign, in spite of perfectly living the standards and praying and fasting regularly.

I remember the day and the hour hen I found out it was all lies, and how stunned I was.Someone had brought the article to a party at a member's house and passed it around.

Incredibly, some idiot members even wrote letters to the newspaper defending Dunn's lies.

What a mindfuck Mormonism is.

Ooops - Kim

Was that warm fuzzy tingling feeling that lump in your throat, that burning in your bosom, the same feeling, lump, and burning that devout TBMs experience when they get their answers to prayer that the Book of Mormon is true and that Joseph Smith was a Prophet of God???

OOPS!!!

Never mind.

That reminds me - Thomas S. Monson

That reminds me of the time I first met Brother Dunn we were in the same Scout troop, good ol' troop 88. We were selling cookies door to door to raise funds for an old widow woman who lived nearby. We came to a door and knocked and who should answer but Babe Ruth. Yes, the baseball player. We had a long conversation with Mr. Ruth. We shared the gospel with him and we even schedule the missionaries to come over and teach him the discussion. He handed a baseball to brother Dunn, and this inpired brother Dunn to play baseball. Babe Ruth quietly joined the church and was baptised in a secret ceremony. He died two days later. On his death bed he thanked me for bringing him the gospel. As for the old widow woman, I don't remember what happened to her. I think she died shortly after, but I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that she got to meet Babe Ruth in Paradise.

I believed! - Tyler

Not by a burning of the bosom or by the spirit. The stories sounded like God working on behalf of his favorite children...faithful mormons. I believed them because I believed the church was true and that leaders were chosen by inspiration and that leaders didn't lie for exagarration or for increased book sales (money).

I believed because I was trusting and took with unquestioning faith that what those with more life wisdom were telling me was true. God's church is true, therefore the leaders are inspired, therefore they tell the truth and act on an altruistic level.

LOL What a naive dumb fuck I was!

Puzzled - fooled40years

I was puzzled about the baseball stories. I collected baseball cards as a kid, and I was trying to get cards of all the LDS players. I couldn't figure out why I couldn't find his baseball card listed in all of the catalogs. That didn't bother me too much because they didn't make cards of every player, especially when he was supposedly playing.

I was really puzzled when I looked in the Baseball Encyclopedia, which lists the statistics of every player that ever played, and his name was not to be found.

I believed that a GA would not make up "true" stories, and figured it was more likely that someone made a mistake in the Baseball Encyclopedia.

Golly Gee Pauly Pooh

09/10/2003 - Connell the Barbarian

Paul H Dunn Before I left on my mish to Brazil in 1980, because I had long been in "the Lord's Program" for turning my faggoty-ass into a procreatin' Het, I was required to report to a GA to get his Good Housekeeping Squeel of Approval. I was told that I would have the Totally Awesome privilege of meeting with Paul Dunn at the Church Admin Building. I showed up all stoked to meet a True Geritol Authority for some one-on-one. Well I spent a grand total of 1.5 minutes with the jerk. He asked if I had been "cured", I lied and said, "Golly gee flippin yeah!"

He shrugged, pronounced me clean and told me to make sure to marry one of the daughters of Zion upon my return from the mission field (I shoulda asked for the phone numbers of his daughters to see just how sure the Lord was that I had become a breedin' heterosekshal), and I got him to sign my Triple Combination. I walked out of there my head in a spin. I had realized that revelation from the Lord happened so quickly, crisply, and efficiently.

I still have that Triple Comb with Pauly-Pooh's signature. Unfortunately much of the rest of the book is ripped out, as I used all the racist, sexist passages in it as rolling papers for marijuana joints.

Blessed is every herb of the field!!!

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I feel a song coming on.......

Paul H Dunn stories that my teacher tells to me
All are so exciting,
Even ‘tho they’re fallacy.
Paul H Dunn’s a liar, cuz he never tells the truth.
Says he was a baseball star
Like Babe Ruth. - 10/09/2004 - I write the songs

Dunn's house is bigger than the standard Mormon chapel? - 07/20/2003 - anon

The Church leadership must have known

06/25/2003 - Steve Benson

The Church leadership must have known about Dunn's dubious stories long before he was finally exposed.

At BYU, I had a political science professor named Ray Hillam who had edited a book, entitled, "A Time to Kill," featuring wartime episodes from the lives of Mormon soldiers in combat.

It was compiled and published before Dunn was undone. I asked Hillam why, during the preparation of the book, he did not include any of Dunn's fantastic war tales.

Hillam told me that he had done some investigating into Dunn's claims, including speaking with sources inside the Church (whom he did not name), and the consensus was that the exploits were so fantastic that their credibility was highly questionable.

Rather than pursue the matter further at that time, Hillam told me he just decided to drop any idea of publishing Dunn's amazing action-packed accounts.

For what it's worth, it seems highly unlikely to me that skeptical opinion of Dunn's tales had not been voiced within earshot of His Fakiness's superiors.

Put more precisely, the GAs had to have known that Dunn's tales were suspicious, at best, and lies, at worst. Yet, they did nothing until the media blew the whistle on him--then quietly retired him without firing a shot.

The day I received a phone call from
Senator Orrin Hatch asking me to help him
protect Paul H. Dunn from media investigation . . .

02/12/2003 - Steve Benson

I was going through some old files today and came across some recollections I had written down about a phone call I received some years ago from Senator Orrin Hatch, asking me to help him protect Paul H. Dunn from media scrutiny.

The account of the Hatch call was originally intended as part of a presentation I gave at a Sunstone symposium shortly after leaving the Mormon Church, but because of time constraints, it was left unmentioned.

Below is the account from the prepared text:

"One day [Senator Orrin Hatch] called me asking a favor. He had heard that my colleagues at the Arizona Republic were investigating allegations that Elder Paul H. Dunn had manufactured claims about his war and baseball careers. He asked me to prevail on my reporter friends to kill the investigation.

"The senator was making the request, he said, because Paul Dunn was 'a good friend' whom he wished to protect from Lynn Packer, a Mormon journalist who had made the charges, [and] whom Hatch accused of having 'an axe to grind against the Church.'

"I felt very uncomfortable and asked Senator Hatch if he had looked into the allegations against Elder Dunn to see if they were true. He admitted he had not. I told him I could not, in good conscience, interfere with the developing story. The phone conversation quickly ended, with Senator Hatch saying he might get back to me. He never did. The story, of course, later ran and Elder Dunn confessed he had, indeed, exaggerated his exploits."

Comment Section

If a company or any other individual sold lies as fact, they typically offer refunds on top of the public apology. The books, tapes etc would have been re-badged or dropped from the shelves or from production.

As a general authority who most likely rose through the ranks with such stories, he should have been held to a higher standard. The shops and publishers should have demanded the author correct his actions.

His explanations and apologies are shady as well and only helped dig a larger hole. Good grief, comparing his actions to Jesus himself!! Jesus never made himself out to be anyone or anything. His actions spoke for him. He also never made himself out to be one of the characters in his parables. He was humble and did not take credit for other's actions. Most importantly he didn't have books and tapes to market.

He got away with what he did due to the lack of centralized sources of information - ie the internet. The fact no one, literally no one asked questions or asked him to stop the fabrications for the 20+ years he told them raises other red flags.

Telling the truth is difficult and humbling. Saying "Barack Obama used my product and loved it as we broke bread together in the white house" or "Steve Jobs said I'm the next big thing". would make individuals successful temporarily .. that is until they are caught, fined or possibly held accountable in a court of law.

My testimony is not shaken. He is certainly not the only bad apple I've seen in the church. The church is a human organization, like every other one. The bar certainly was low for this one. - 07/14/2013 - disappointed

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It's sad that so many of you get all upset and swear at him for telling some good stories. So they were embellished. You were more interested and got more out of them for it, and many people were inspired to live better lives because of his ability to engage the listener or reader. Maybe he kept them a little "fantastic" so people would take them with a grain of salt, but still get the message he was trying to convey. I knew his daughter Janet, and met him several times, including once in his office at church headquarters. I went to get his advice on a business/moral issue I was struggling with. I found him modest and a little self-effacing but very helpful. I found that he took very seriously his role as a role model and was very humble at the prospect of people actually changing their lives because of anything he had said. People who think he got "rich" from the sale of his books, simply don't understand how the finance world in the church works. It's common knowledge among church book authors that you don't make much. It's not like the popular novel-mystery-fantasy world where the authors become multi-millionairs.

I hope you can all get past this and be more forgiving of a man who spent his life trying to help and inspire people to do better. He and his family suffered greatly from the "scandal" that ensued following his apology. We supposedly believe in repentance and forgiveness. Why can't he be allowed the same privilege? He died a broken-hearted man who gave all he could to the church he loved. His wife didn't deserve the slams she has received, either. It's sad to see people get so much joy from seeing someone destroyed. - 03/30/2013 - still a fan

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I grew up listing to PHD. And should he have put at the bottom of his books/tapes "the content here is Fiction based off of my past experiences"? Maybe so. But does that change the wonderful messages he tried to instil in people? Heck no!! Are all of you that are complaining doing so with the spirit of the lord? Everything good comes from the Lord. And I never once felt anything bad listening to any of that mans stories, whether they were true or not. I read lots of books now days that tell fictional story that hit home the same great points he did. Look for the good. Don't dwell on the bad. - 02/28/2012 - Jared

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Fortunately, I was raised by parents who were not big readers of GA literature. I was encouraged to read, but the materials were secular books, many in the Time Life series' that were so popular in the 1970s and 1980s.

I got a Paul H. Dunn book for my birthday once or twice, but I was not too interested in reading that kind of stuff, and since my parents were never the ones that gave them to me, I never felt compelled to read them.

In any event, I remember first encountering Dunn's talks on tape on my mission since one of my companions had a couple. They were entertaining to listen to on P-day, and I did like the one about his boot getting shot off and the tank almost crushing his head.

They provided a nice break from the hard work of being a missionary and a zone leader far from mission headquarters. I suppose they inspired me in some regard. All that being said, my testimony of the truthfulness of the church has never been based on any one person or what they have said. I don't feel angry, or duped, or ripped off. I know the Church is true because I have put the promises and the doctrine to the test. I was inactive and living a heathen's life for several years. I was disfellowshipped and then excommunicated, and yet here I am with a temple marriage, and two sons getting ready to serve missions. I gave up booze and sex out of marriage because of what I knew. I initially fell into those things because of personal weakness, which I thankfully overcame. ANYONE who based their beliefs on Paul Dunn or his stories did themself a great disservice. There is a whole bunch of axe grinding going on here that is mascarading as righteous indignation. Get a life. Leave the Church and then leave it alone. We promise, we won't force you to come back. - 02/14/2012 - migwell463

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Sounds like Paul H Dunn used Joseph Smith for his model. - 05/01/2010 - anon

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I remember a joke shared by a missionary serving in our Brighton, Sussex, ward in the 1990's when we were talking of the PHD stories coming back to bite him in the bum. 'Who Baptised Sadam Hussein? ...... you guessed it! It doesn't change anything to do with the truthfulness of the Gospel though., PHD and Richard Eyre (who ordained me an Elder) just followed the American dream and made a financial pot from the sales! Perhaps they forgot to mention the works were 'embellished' or 'plain fiction.' Anyway its a good source to refer to in a Sacrament talk on the subject of honesty etc. and the perils of not being so! - 10/14/2009 - Trevor

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This is NOT Paul Dunn's home ... I know the family who has lived there for over 10 years. And it's NOT in Alpine OR in a country club. So ... talk about exaggerating for the story or for not getting facts straight. Geez. (you also wrote that these are the "four photos" and only posted three ... so see, even editing problems happen.)

Jean Dunn died this past week and I googled to find information and am glad I came across this site full of MIS-information ... what a waste of your time. Get a life and get over your envy of other's lives. - 09/21/2009 - marty

Editor's Note: This is the home that Paul Dunn built and lived in. Check the Utah County Recorder's Office.

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I remember PHD's talk when I was in missionary training. I also heard him speak at BYU student assembly. I even read his book "Ten Most Wanted Men".

He was very convincing and entertaining. Boy; he could keep everybody interested. Yes; he was a gifted speaker. His stories, though, were so fantastic that they caused skepticism. It did not shock me when the truth came out. I was disappointed, though. I felt that a lot of talent was unnecessarily wasted.

I accept PHD's apology and I hope that it brought peace to him and his family. Lesson learned: Don't rely too much on anybody's personal stories. Like the fisherman who "lost the big one", we all like to fantasize. - 08/26/2009 - gps

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I got curious about PHD's 'after confession' life and found this website. I am amazed that his fall affected so many people in such a dramatic way. I have to agree with many commentators - that most of the hard critics are ex-members. It makes sense to justify personal failings with the sins of others. All in all, I have to agree with the critics, a GA has to be beyond reproach. If Michael Jordan and Charles Barkley can't escape being role models, a General Authority should be expected to walk the talk. Brother Dunn should have been excommunicated. But, hey, now I'm sinning a bit - I'm not qualified to be his Judge. - 05/10/2009 - LuvtobeHaight

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I have read the comments here and find that most people just don't get it. Yes PHD was wrong for telling tall tales as truth. I have read many of his books but never cared if it was a story or the truth, I just appreciated the lesson that was be conveyed and the truthfulness of the gospel it taught. My testimony has always been strengthed by the gospel truths conveyed in a story, not on the person telling the story. Our Savior used stories to convey principles, this was done to help relate to the times or the crowds undertanding. The fact is that stories are used in all aspects of life to either hide something or to bring understanding to a principle we may not understand otherwise. - 04/08/2009 - scjohnson72

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In 1989 I attended a special multi-zone conference put together by one of the assistants to the president who was a rabid fan of Elder Dunn. I’d heard his talks before and was enthusiastic about attending. He stood in front of us and rattled off in monotone every story he had ever told until his voice began to get hoarse. It was hot in the chapel and the missionaries began to wilt after several hours, some falling asleep. Eventually Elder Dunn stopped in mid sentence and said, “Well it looks like you’ve given up on me so I’ll give up on you.” This ended his talk.

During the long talk, the thought occurred to me that his stories were simply not true. They couldn't be. I mentioned this on the ride home and the assistant who had organized the event essentially tore me a new corn hole. I felt vindicated (though justifiably disappointed) a few years later when the truth was revealed, but I have always felt sad for this young missionary, I think his name was Clanton, who had essentially based his faith on the dubious testimony of one man. I am sure he was crushed.

I am still a faithful member because my testimony is based on more than faith in imperfect men. - 03/31/2009 - Jon

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I think I listened to almost every talk Paul H D unn had ever at least recorded up until the mid 1970,s. My high school seminary teacher was in total awe of the man.

My father knew he was a liar,and expressed so at the very peril of his standing in the church. See old Paul H traveled down to our little hamlet in Central Utah in the late 60,s and spoke at I believe it was stake conference. Wheras he started in on this whopper about watching the battle of Iwo Jima rage from ships along with some fellow soldiers (Yes Army) and immediately volunteered to go in and do some of the more dangerous things that they were having trouble getting the beat up and battered Marines to do.

My dad was 5 division 26th Marines, had landed on Red Beach 2 on day one and actually had lived through some of the horrible things Paul H Dunn fantasized about. My father was hotter than the volcanic ash under Mt. Surabachi. He immediately after the service told his bishop and whoever would listen that Paul H Dunn was a liar and should be confronted and he personally would like to be the man to do it.

He was told he had better let it go, and was actually questioned if he was sure as to what really transpired on Iwo Jima. Boy wrong question! Anyway my dad never wavered and it cost him with good church members.

When Paul H Dunn was unmasked I think my dad felt justified (though he never gloated) but he knew Paul H Dunn had never been there. As I am sure there were Mormon men from Omaha Beach that knew Paul H Dunn was not one of them, Baseball fans had to have known. We sometimes find ourselves in such a sorry state because of the fear to question authority.

I do find pride in knowing that my dad tried even at the risk of losing all his standing in his community. He thought that was an extremely small price to pay compared to alot of men he had known that had paid the ultimate price to claim to have been on Iwo Jima.

Today is November 11 my dad died 5 years ago. On this Veterans Day I do think and thank all the men like my dad that realy have served in the absolute most horrible conditions our world has ever known. And to question men like Paul H Dunn that realy did serve his country honorably (HE WAS A SOLDIER ON OKINAWA)

With no doing of his own he, Paul H Dunn was placed in mostly safe areas doing safe things during his time. With just a slight change and no doing of his own he could have just as easily been at Omaha Beach, Bastogne or Peilu, etc, just where the army needed bodies at the time. And I am sure Paul H Dunn would have done his duty. Just the cards never unfolded that way so Paul H Dunn made a living telling whoppers and was able to miss out on the never ending wake up in the middle of the night nightmares that my dad suffered with to his last day. - 11/11/2009 - 70's seminary student

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I used to work with PHD's son-in-law, Gerald Winget, and he was more full of Sh** than Elder Dunn. When I met Elder Dunn I have to admit I was a little awe struck, but the TRUTH is still the TRUTH, and the principles taught by the church still hold true to me. For you Nay-Sayers please provide one principle taught by the church that is not true? As for those who say the only thing church leaders are interested in is money, then why not get paid to preach? - 10/24/2008 - True beleiver

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It is certain that individual members frequently shit the bed. Paul H. Dunn will probably have an extended stay in the Lord's Woodshed. That does not change the fact that the Gospel is true. We are consistently counselled to ponder and pray regarding the teachings of our leaders. The Spirit will testify of the truthfulness of their words. - 10/04/2008 - chuck ingals

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Ok......i know he did wrong over-exploiting his stories that never occurred....however what PUZZLES me....is in his letter, he wrote this...

have been accused of various activities unbecoming a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

I confess that I have not always been accurate in my public talks and writings. Furthermore, "I have indulged in other activities inconsistent with the high and sacred office which I have held."" <-----------WHAT OTHER ACTIVITIES did he indulge in??

did he get caught up in another woman?? what "other activities" did he do besides the fairy-tales....please SOMEONE enlighten me with what "really" happened and not their own personal theories. - 05/30/2008 - Brett

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THE EVIL THAT MEN DO LIVES AFTER THEM- THE GOOD IS OFT INTURRED WITH THEIR BONES-shakespear Paul H. Dunn did alot of good in his life by helping and uplifting others. He took responsibility for his mistakes. ARE ANY OF YOU WHO ARE CRITICS ANY BETTER? HOW MUCH SERVICE TO THE LORD DO YOU GIVE! - 05/26/2008 - Richard K

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I too had checked the baseball encyclopedia for PHD when I was in elementary school in the 70s and was a little perplexed to have not found him. His stories often seemed incredible too. I remember getting his autograph once when he spoke in our building. So he admitted to have not been totally truthful. I'm glad he got that off his chest. I'm glad he felt bad for what he did. The fact that a leader misled people, however, isn't the end of the world. He screwed up over a long period of time. Lies kind of result in us having to feed them until we finally fess up or not.

While I feel bad for his bad choices, this in no way affects the way I feel about the Church. If I were such a goober to base my faith on an individual or his stories, then I wouldn't have much of a testimony. This website seems to be full of those who (A) feel stupid for being "hoodwinked" after having spent all that money for inspirational media or (B) those cynics who for once feel like they've been vindicated. I am probably one of a vast majority who say this whole thing is a shame but has no real bearing on my feelings about the Church. People screw up sometimes and hopefully they change their ways. As for me, regardless what PHD said, it doesn't change what the BoM says. I'd say glorying in the sin of another is probably just as bad. - 04/26/2008 - The Dude

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Paul H. Dunn was my mission president. Charismatic, but aloof. Of course, the real problem was my own insecure self. Too many years later, a fellow Mormon friend handed me another book, "The True Believer," by Eric Hoffer. Wow! Mormanism, whew; but were it 1930's, I might've become a Nazi or something worse. I am soooo relieved not to have my head in the ground any more. (Especially at 2am on a moonless night in the dessert. When I may have replaced PHD with Carl Sagan. Ha.)

Wow. Paul H. Dunn. - 04/08/2008 - Michael

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I have read the above comments with sadness and incredulity. For the most part the real vitriol and invective seems to come from disaffected mormons who for personal reasons have left the LDS church and in typical fashion they 'leave the church but cannot leave it alone.' PHD did wrong. He aplogised, repented and tried to put it right. Even if you don't like what he did then in the words of the Saviour, "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone." Anyone considering themselves a Christian ought to be ashamed if they are one of the aforementioned and might I suggest that you have missed the point of Christianity. - 04/08/2008 - Lance Jackson

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Consider this: Paul H Dunn claimed to do many unbelievable things, he was caught red-handed and confessed that not all his stories were true, but think about it this way. In an interview that Paul gave after his letter he wrote to the members of the church he compared his stories to the parables of Jesus. None of Christ's parables were true, but were told to emphasize a point He was making. Paul did the same thing. He confessed to it and the issue should be dropped. - 02/13/2008 - Nicole

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Is there none that can become an apostle like Judas did? Judas probably told some tall stories Too!!!! - 02/01/2008 - Judas

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Man, why did you guys expose him? I was using his stories for my talks in church!! They were hot.....now I have to actually do some research! - 02/10/2008 - JC

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You must have a very sad life if this is all you have to do is nit pik public speakers stories. I could go through all the presidents and Billy Grahm stories and do the same thing you have done to Paul H. Dunn.

No one is perfect not even men of God, but we can listen to their counsel and be better off than listening to someone like you. What is you biograpy in life? - 01/30/2008 - tesdgs

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I think the Lord may allow some to falter over history. JUST TO KEEP OUT THE LOW LIFE RIFF RAFF. Good rittens guys! - 08/10/2007 - bjennings

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Ok mister logistical thinker. Your right, we must remember that they are human and are prone to mistakes. Thats why they should do away with the "do you support your local leader and the leaders of the church" question when you go and get your temple recommend. We are supposed to obey these guys, blindly, and witout question because they are on a pipeline to God. A better recommend question should be "Do you support the leaders of the Church most of the time, understanding that they are human, and subject to telling huge lies, along with a host of other worldly transgressions?" - 08/06/2007 - hijodelway

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I remember well how, when I was 14-15, my Teachers' Quorum Adviser liked to use Paul Dunn talk tapes to fill an entire Priesthood lesson. I had no objection; his talks were easy to listen to and pretty entertaining. I gotta admit, I figured they were completely true. I remember hearing the talk where he told about getting his boot and other gear shot off. I even remember an elementary teacher relating, during my 6th grade class, the story about the Japanese tanks crushing Marines in their foxholes. The teacher even chalked a drawing showing how the loose-hanging tracks of one tank had come to rest on PHD's shoulders, before the tank backed away.

In short, PHD was a huge part of the pop church culture where I grew up in rural Utah. I remember thinking the Marines were morons for just sitting in their foxholes when they had a tank bearing down on them, instead of climbing out and making a run for it. But I'd always thought adults had a few screws loose. I was raised during the height of the PMA (positive mental attitude) craze, a trend that went on merciful hiatus during my adulthood and is experiencing an unfortunate renaissance with the popularity of "The Secret." Anyway, as early as 3rd grade I remember bridling with intellectual indignation when a teacher kept assuring us, "You can do ANYTHING you want to," usually following a story about some Apollo astronaut who, as a child, had told his wet-blanket father "Someday I'm going to the moon." To which my unsophisticated but valid response was, "Oh yeah? What if I wanted to lift this building?"

In the home where I grew up, there wasn't a single novel that didn't come from Reader's Digest Condensed. When I was about 13 I remember counting the number of self-help books on our shelves, though, and I've always remembered that we had 117. Titles like Looking Out For Number One, Your Erroneous Zones, and all manner of pop-psyche, PMA drivel.

Paul Dunn was just one more brick in the edifice. He was the church's version of the Amway speakers I heard when my parents started taking us to whoop-it-up conventions. The only difference in the PMA preachers and the PHD message was the terminology: faith vs. positive thinking. In my home, my parents didn't own novels

I never took the church as seriously as I thought I should until I'd fled home and was serving in South Korea as an artilleryman with the 2nd Infantry Division. There I had no near-death experiences, but I did read the Book of Mormon for the first time. I had my personal conversion. Two years later I was out of the Army and served a mission to England. It was there, in 1992, that I first heard the news about PHD's perfidy.

I don't clearly remember what I thought about PHD when I heard his talk tapes, but I do clearly remember how I felt when I learned he was a fraud: Happy. I can't claim I'd known he was full of baloney, I can only say it was a relief to hear it. His style of speaking, his twisted theology of "you can do anything you believe you can if you're good like me" reminded me of all the stuff I'd felt free to reject in the secular world, and instinctively disliked when it showed up in a church setting.

Months after that, I was gifted a copy of The Divine Center by Stephen R. Covey, the book he wrote for an LDS audience that included his Seven Habits, years before he became a guru in the self-improvement industry. In it he made the point, supported by LDS scripture, that PMA is a load of crap.

The beginning of my true conversion to the LDS faith happened in Korea, when I read the Book of Mormon. But it couldn't be as strong as it needed to be, I believe, until the ghost of PHD's bull-filled talk tapes was exorcised once and for all.

Paul Dunn is dead, but Jesus lives! - 07/08/2007 - Preston McConkie

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Fun reading. It really cheered me up. - 06/30/2007 - RadonSKuffle

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Hey, let's all assume that just because somebody managed to fool you into thinking HE was something he was not, that EVERYTHING he's associated with must be false, too, eh? Let's not base a testimony of gospel principles on the principles themselves, but rather how we felt when some guy told us stories that turned out to be lies. So I assume that when Clinton was exposed as a liar (or Bush, whichever your political leanings may lean toward), you probably gave up on Democracy, eh? switched over to Communism or perhaps joined the Taliban? - 03/27/2007 - anon

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Man you need some forgiveness in your heart and a different channel for your anger. I never thought anyone would spend so much time slamming an apologetic person. - 03/20/2007 - Jiggy

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No, morons. You don't base your faith in a SYSTEM of PRINCIPLES upon the stories, true or not, of ANYBODY. you base it on your personal experiences with those principles. I don't care if you believe in the church or not, but don't go off and talk about Paul Dunn like he has any pertinance to whether it's tenets are true or not.

"Furthermore, I have indulged in other activities inconsistent with the high and sacred office which I have held."

Ok, what "other activities" did he indulge in as well? (2nd-3rd line of first paragraph paragraph) Adultry? Embezzlement? - 03/01/2007 - anon

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To answer anon's question if 03/01/2007, I think most informed people at the time understood the "other activities" Dunn apologized for to be a reference to his involvement in the Grant Afflect affair. Affleck was a con man who worked by first cultivating relationships with influential persons, urging them to invest in his schemes, delivering phenomenal results (at first), and then persuading them to give their personal endorsement. Dunn was one of those who did so, which no doubt helped influence some victims to trust Afflect. Dunn himself was reported to lose a large amount of money in the end.

As for the stories, I listened to them eagerly because they were entertaining and taught good principles. However, ANYbody who paid any attention knew the stories couldn't possibly be true because of the many biographical and chronological contradictions between them. Even before I realized that, I certainly *never* had a "burning bosom testimony" manifestation of their truth; only the warm fuzzy that comes with a well-spun morale tale. Judging from all the glurges (see www.snopes.com for definition) clogging my in-box, I'm not the only sucker for a faith-promoting "this is really true" story. - 09/13/2007 - MD

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Lest we forget that people are human. We make mistakes and can become missguided. People tend to put various church leaders on pedestils of perfection without reason. I beleive it's safe to saythat just about every religion has had a leader or two with some blemishes. One's relationship with God is an intimate one and relies on faith. Yes I am a mormon, yes I still beleive. Regardless of what any individual's mistakes are the principles hold true for me. The gospel is perfect the members are not. - 01/15/2007 - K250

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You guys based your faith on this guys talks about sports and war? What a collection of dumb sh*ts. If you believe in God then why don't you check out His word instead of Pual H. Dunn's. What a collection of idiots! Whine some more, boo hoo! - 12/18/2006 - Really?

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